The "0-Ohm" Headphone Amplifier

By John Siau

The Sonic Advantages of Low-Impedance Headphone Amplifiers

The circuits used to drive headphones are often added to a product without careful consideration of the difficult loads presented by high-quality headphones. The most common circuit is an opamp driver followed by a 30-Ohm series resistor. The series resistor provides short-circuit and overload protection while isolating the opamp from the inductance and capacitance of the headphones. The series resistor protects the opamp while keeping it stable. In contrast, today's state-of-the-art headphone amplifiers eliminate the series resistor, and use a high current driver. This change reduces distortion and flattens the frequency response when a headphone is driven. These new high-end designs are often called "0-Ohm" headphone amplifiers, and are essentially miniature power amplifiers. This paper provides measurements which demonstrate the significant advantages of headphone amplifiers with very low (near 0-Ohm) output impedances. A low output impedance increases the damping factor of the amplifier-headphone system. This paper will show that a high damping factor reduces distortion at the headphone inputs, improves phase response, and flattens frequency response.

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John Siau
John Siau

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